Scrapbook 29 :: Tumblr Edition

I’ve written that I have a love / hate relationship with Tumblr and it’s still true, but I find myself growing in the third direction: apathy. Who really cares about the platform and the demographics? There is good and bad, sure, but take both and make something out of it. I’ve had a few revelations in design philosophy over the past few months and I’ll write better about them when I can work out exactly what it all means, but suffice to say: I’m a lot easier going as of late.

There are lots of awesome Tumblrs out there, most of which I haven’t even found yet. A few that I do know of and like include:

The Black Workshop
Setsudo
tech_spec
brave cadet
Jon Wong is, of course, the ever talented graphic artist of ISO50 fame
Uncrate of whom you should already be familiar.
Stiknord I like because it’s more obscure things.
Anchor Division for those leaning on the hipster side of fashion.
Technosoul
Naturama

…and of course the official Acrylo Tumblr which is just shameless reposts of the above with the occasional injection from my own massive catalogue of inspiration.

Scrapbook 28 :: Matte Black

Photos click through to source.

Scrapbook 27

Scrapbook 27: Red.

This week’s been crazy; thank you for only revolting a little bit about the lack of posts:

Imagine my surprise when I saw that on the news. I knew my fans were passionate, but wow!

Haha.

Scrapbook 26

Saarinen grasshopper chair

Warm minimalism.

It’s silly that I need that adjective. Minimalism, despite common reputation, is not¬†inherently¬†cold. But, I’ve ranted on this before, so I’ll leave it be.

Scrapbook 25

I haven’t done a scrapbook in a while since the Acrylo Inspiration Tumblr started, but I miss the ability to group things into common colours, say. I see it as a sort of visual playlist, things from every source coming together into a sort of complimentary harmony.

So, I’ll continue to do both, I think.

 

Scrapbook 24

Since no one actually clicks through the links (seriously, literally no one in all of the traffic that comes through) I usually curate, I’m just not going to do it anymore.

Copyright, of course, to the original creators. Enjoy!

Scrapbook 23

Orange.

The middle one is concept art from the short animated film Slimtime:

Scrapbook 22

I love the Popular Science mags of yesteryear. They’re so bright and optimistic about the future; the war is over-ish and people are ready to use all this technology to sculpt the perfect world out.

What went wrong?

Even the PopSci of today is getting increasingly jaded, whittled down to reviewing cell phones and consumer tech that have already come out. That’s not the future! Is futurism dead? Where is Syd Mead?

There’s a quote I read the other day that really struck me personally, the sources are shaky but it was either said by Obama or Will Smith (so who knows, really). It reads:

“Being realistic is the fastest way to mediocrity.”

I am a realistic person. I am imaginative, don’t get me wrong. Creative to the limit, outside the space outside the box, but I am a very realistic person.

The world, I think, is getting increasingly mediocre. Does that mean we are getting increasingly realistic? More importantly, does that mean we are getting jaded to the point that the future is no longer bright for us?

I mean, right now is pretty amazing – better than most scifi authors could have thought. We have these things that everyone carries that can access the entire world’s knowledge near-instantly. We can talk to anyone in the entire world if we want to. We live twice as long as we did a hundred years ago. We’re smarter and faster and stronger, and yet we see this world as somehow inadequate; monotonous.

Bored people are boring people.

So, I like the futurists. I like that optimism for things. I vow to try and incorporate that into my life and my work. Perhaps if everyone did we can reverse this apparent trend.

Scrapbook 21

Illustrations!

Scrapbook 19

And… more red, it seems.

My inspirations folder on this PC is much more limited, I’m afraid.

Mostly via Designworklife


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